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[2021 Eco-Friendly Lifestyles] Start the Zero Waste Journey with Everyday Beauty Routine

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As customers, this past year has taught us how much our lifestyles impact the planet. News of a plastic crisis has forced many to evaluate their current consumption habits. And with an alarming 67% of the UK’s total plastic waste coming from packaging, many realised bathroom essentials are single-use sinners.

Then zero waste beauty entered – a movement determined to minimise the environmental impact of beauty products by resorting to recycling and using natural materials. The movement has gained momentum fast, and Mintel has announced it as this year’s global beauty trend.

We have already seen some great change with global brands such as L’Oreal and Colgate-Palmolive pledging to make all its packaging recyclable by 2025, and in the latest news, Lush has opened its first packaging-free shop in the UK. However, a zero waste routine starts with you.

Marta, a blogger and natural soap maker at bottegazerowaste.com, has been living zero waste for one year.

 

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How is your week going so far? I have been busy packing your orders and formulating some new soap recipes coming up soon! Thank you again to everybody who is supporting Bottega Zero Waste’s mission! 💕 . Today I wanted to show you the packing process and what materials I use to minimize waste! . -all the soaps come in a compostable paper which is made of algae and FSC sustainable wood and are glued together with a compostable, almond-based glue. All the samples are sent tied together with a simple jute twine -the boxes are made of cardboard and close without the need of glue but I have to secure them with 1 thin layer of tape for security reasons -to secure the boxes, I have been using a gummed tape which sticks to paper only with a few drops of water (so there is no glue) and have now switched to a compostable tape made with a plant based compostable glue – there is a thin layer of tissue paper in the boxes to protect the soaps, and if more protection is needed, you may find a bit of paper which I reuse from supplier’s orders. -you will also find a little thank you note in your packages as I really love connecting with you! – I use left over paper from the print out of previous soap labels/shipping labels for this! . Do you have any suggestions on how to minimize/get rid of waste even more? Let me know in the comments below! . #naturalproducts #handmadesoap #ecobeauty #soapmaking #zerowastehome #goingzerowaste #vegansoap #veganbeauty #naturalbeautycare #zerowastelondon #naturalskincare #saponi #palmoilfreesoap #naturalsoaps #palmoilfree #soapshop #organicbeauty #organicskincare #shoplaunch #packagefree #handmadeskincare #loveyourskin #handmadebeauty #skincarecommunity #greenbeauty #skincareaddition #unpackaged #compostable #coldprocesssoap #sabon

A post shared by Bottega Zero Waste – Marta (@bottegazerowaste) on

 

How did you get started on a zero waste beauty routine? 

My interest in zero waste started with the need of controlling what I was putting on my skin and how much waste my lifestyle was producing. I realised the only way to have a zero waste beauty routine was to produce everything myself. I started researching and became very interested in natural soap. A simple bar of soap solves many problems at once. It works as a hand, body and face soap as well as a shampoo bar. I fell in love with this art so much that I have opened my own soap shop.

What has been the most challenging about keeping your beauty routine waste-free?

My main challenge is to find ingredients that are completely plastic free. I work with some suppliers that are willing to send their ingredients in paper. Most of the oils I use are sold in tins and glass, and for some oils I have the plastic bottles refilled by my suppliers. There are, however, some ingredients that you cannot find plastic free. For example, sodium hydroxide, necessary to make soap, is a quite a caustic material to start with – it then goes away in the soap – and legally has to be sent in heavy duty plastic. The good thing is that it is fully recyclable and that there is no trace left on the bottle once finished, so the plastic is clean when you throw it away making it easier to recycle.

What are your favourite zero waste beauty products or brands? 

I absolutely love Geo-organics – its charcoal dental floss saved my life. It lasts ages and once finished you can buy refills. Another brand I like is Bambaw – I love its bamboo safety razors. Lamazuna also has a lot of cool plastic free bathroom swaps. I have never been super into makeup, but I would like to try Zao Cosmetics soon, as I have heard many good things about it.

Why would you recommend people make their beauty routine zero waste?

Everything we put on our skin goes into our body. If we care about this and are already buying organic green beauty products, why not think about the impact we put on our environment as well? There are more and more handmade, all-natural brands out there which do not support the use of plastic in the beauty industry and really make an effort to produce with the lowest impact possible. In my opinion, supporting local, small businesses that produce natural, plastic-free health and beauty products is the way to do something good for your health and the environment at the same time.

What is your best advice for people just getting started on zero waste beauty?

Start with soap. Just one soap can reduce so much plastic from your life. Then consider making some things yourself, you can find lots of tutorials around the internet. Another piece of advice is not to buy a bunch of different zero waste alternatives to products you use. You will soon realize you do not need as many things, and that a zero waste life can also lead you to a lighter, minimalistic life where it is the essentials that really count.

Jess, blogger at talkingrubish.com – has been living zero waste for two years. 

 

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Plastic free and low waste makeup post on the blog now! Link in the bio 🌿 For this post I collaborated with @merielgarlandmakeup and together we have come up with a few options for a mindful makeup bag! 🌿 Speaking to someone in the industry meant that I have learnt some insider tips and tricks, such as using multi-purpose products and building your own makeup artist palette to reduce packaging 🌿 Meriel was really keen to express that we are not influenced to buy a different product for every use! For example, you can use lipstick as a blusher, bronzer and highlighters as eyeshadows, and eyeliner brushed through your brows. 🌿 The idea is to get creative and have some fun!! I hope you enjoy it 💕🌿⭐️

A post shared by Jess Macdonald (@talking.rubbish_norwich) on

 

How did you get started on a zero waste beauty routine?

My bathroom was one of the initial areas that I wanted to tackle because this is where I noticed a lot of plastic waste. The first simple step I took was using a bar of soap instead of face and body washes. I then looked at my skincare routine and simplified it down to just one or two products. Now my routine is water only in the mornings and Aleppo soap at night to wash my face. I then moisturise with a few drops of rosehip or jojoba oil. The same pretty much goes for washing my body, except I use coconut oil to moisturise. To remove makeup I use either jojoba oil or coconut oil, and a muslin cloth drenched in warm water.

What has been the most challenging about keeping your beauty routine waste-free? 

For me the most challenging part was makeup. I quite often suffer from breakouts and at those times I feel like wearing foundation or concealer. I also enjoy putting on makeup to go out for drinks, or on particular days when I want to make an extra effort. I have found that there aren’t many zero waste makeup options, and the brands that are available are often expensive. Although, since adopting a low-waste lifestyle I have managed to minimise my makeup bag so that it contains only a few good quality products that last.

What are your favourite zero waste beauty products or brands?

A favourite beauty tip of mine is to use a natural, olive oil based castile soap such as Aleppo or Marseille. I buy them completely package-free or in cardboard, and they replace shampoo, facial wash and shower gel and are great for shaving. I also love Suma shampoo and refill my bottle at either The Green Grocers or Vauxhall Street pharmacy.  I use Neal’s Yard or Trilogy for facial oils, and Lush for their toothy tabs, solid deodorant and solid perfume.  Other favourite brands of mine are Geo-organics, Brush with Bamboo and RMS Beauty.

Why would you recommend people making their beauty routine zero waste?

Zero waste is trying not to send anything to landfill, which could end up polluting our seas and harming animals and our environment.  Making your beauty routine as zero waste as possible can make a real impact on how much plastic is being used. Also, using organic, 100% natural and toxic free products is so much better for your health.  Finally, it is a much simpler, and cheaper way of living. It encourages you to make mindful purchases that challenge the societal norms dictating what we should buy.

What is your best advice for people just getting started on zero waste beauty?

Start small and tackle one product at a time. Try not to throw all your products away when you are embarking on a zero waste routine. The best method I found was to replace each of my beauty products with a plastic-free or sustainable option after it had run out.  For instance, finish any shower gels or shampoos that you have and then replace with a bar of soap or shampoo bar. It is also important to persevere with some switches, such as using shampoo bars or oils on your face, to allow your skin to adjust. You may also need to try out a few different products, and do some research, to find out what works for you.  It is a slow road to zero waste but it is a lifestyle that is so beneficial for both you and the environment.

Zoë, blogger at aintnoplanetb.com – has been living zero waste for 2 years.

 

 

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💋💋💋 Cotton face towel = Cleansing make up wipes. I apply a dash of watered-down Castile soap so I can cleanse without having to splash my face. I use every corner until the towel looks like it’s been shot with a make a gun. Then, I throw it in the washing machine on a cold cycle with my homemade laundry powder because I’m extra. . . ✂️✂️✂️ DIY trick: Cut up old microfibre or cotton robes to make soft make up wipes in custom sizes. I have teeny tiny squares that are perfect for travelling. When they’re all used up, I wash the lot in a delicates bag so they don’t get lost in the laundry. . . #makeup #makeupwipes #diybeauty #beautytrick #diy #diytips #savemoney #savetheplanet #aintnoplanetb #zerowaste #facetowel #facecleanser #castilesoap #easy #simpleswaps #cleanyourface #yafilthyanimal . 📷 @muckmuddy

A post shared by Zoë Jazz – Ain’t no Planet B (@aintnoplanetb) on

 

How did you get started on a zero waste beauty routine?

I have officially been using the term zero waste for two years but unofficially, I’ve been actively reducing my impact over the last five to ten years. 

What has been the most challenging about keeping your beauty routine waste-free? 

Learning to be brave and groom less, wear less make up and not straighten my hair were big scary steps. Not straightening my hair was the first step. I had to get used to my natural self.

What are your favourite zero waste beauty products or brands?

The ones I make myself. The stand-out winners are my multipurpose balm, deodorant and plain oils like olive or coconut oil.

Why would you recommend people making their beauty routine zero waste? 

Aside from environmental benefits – less hazardous liquid waste, packaging and emissions – there’s sociological and psychological gains from it: confidence, feminism, self-realisation, minimalism. It also makes travel extremely easy.

What is your best advice for people just getting started on zero waste beauty? 

After taking the time to observe your own habits, take note of opportunity areas that might be easy the change. Choose one incremental change until it feels normal. Then add another. If it doesn’t feel right, that’s ok. Try something else and don’t worry if you’re not ready to be 100% zero waste because – spoiler alert – nobody is truly zero waste.

Good places to start are: Not blow-drying or straightening hair, moisturising with olive oil, using up your products and not replacing them, shaving with a safety razor, making your own balms, face/hair masks and dying hair with henna. Aim for something that is easy to change. The lower the effort, the more likely the habit will stick.

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